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Forums Book Publishing E-publishing How do You Decide Where to Sell Your E-books?

This topic contains 4 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Jennifer Mattern 1 month, 1 week ago.

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  • #28165

    Jennifer Mattern
    Keymaster

    When it comes to e-publishing, where do you prefer to sell your e-books? Do you always use the same distribution models, or does it depend on the book?

    For me, I plan to release my fiction on Amazon and other popular online outlets. But much, if not most, of my nonfiction will be sold only on my own sites. That’s because I tend to already have an established platform in those areas (where I target fairly limited markets) and Amazon’s artificial pricing structure doesn’t suit the types of e-books I usually prefer to publish. That said, any e-book version of a print book would be available there.

    The one thing I won’t ever do is make myself dependent on Amazon or any other single third party. That’s never a smart business decision (relying on a single third party platform that can make or break your business on a whim — just like bloggers who rely solely on Google for both traffic and revenue). My own hubs online will always be first priority when it comes to promotion, and any bookstore or distribution service will be just one part of that overall promotional plan.

    Jennifer Mattern - Owner 3 Beat Media

    Professional Blogger, Freelance Business Writer, Author

    #28199
    Yo Prinzel
    Yo Prinzel
    Participant

    I sometimes grant Amazon exclusivity for the first three months just because it offers you some extra choices in promotion to do so, but for the long haul I prefer to have my stuff everywhere. I used to sell my books from my own site but it became too overwhelming to continually update the page with new books and it was getting pricey through Ejunkie, so now I only sell autographed paperbacks. I may reassess this strategy at the end of the year, but for now I’m too busy to over complicate things, even if that means I give up a little of the earnings.

    #28201

    Jennifer Mattern
    Keymaster

    What made E-junkie so costly in your case? Was it a matter of how many files / products you were selling at any given time? Did the sales through your site make up for the cost, or were most coming from other sources anyway?

    I’ll always rely on my own sites first for nonfiction. But I can see how that might not be as effective for selling fiction simply because readers aren’t used to buying their fiction that way.

    Jennifer Mattern - Owner 3 Beat Media

    Professional Blogger, Freelance Business Writer, Author

    #28210
    Yo Prinzel
    Yo Prinzel
    Participant

    It was the number of files I was selling. And while I did make sales on the site (many readers want to buy books from whatever retailer the author makes the most money from and there is added cachet from getting the file/confirmation email from the author), it wasn’t enough to keep pace with the Ejunkie fees.

    #28212

    Jennifer Mattern
    Keymaster

    That sucks. I’m sorry to hear it. If you ever decide to give it another try, you sound like a prime candidate for a percentage-based system instead of E-junkie’s flat fees. It wouldn’t work out well in my case, but at least in yours you’d only pay when an actual sale is made, so fees would never exceed sales. :)

    Jennifer Mattern - Owner 3 Beat Media

    Professional Blogger, Freelance Business Writer, Author

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