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This topic contains 6 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by Yo Prinzel Yo Prinzel 1 month, 4 weeks ago.

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  • #24249

    LoriWidmer
    Participant

    Once more I’ve seen a writing pronouncement that I can’t ignore. This one, by a writer I’ve not heard of before, says that unless you’re someone uber-special, your content isn’t going to be read.

    I hate blanket statements like that. They’re simply not true.

    While there is a saturation point for content, there is something we’ll always need — quality, ORIGINAL content. See to me, I’m seeing a lot of recycling of ideas by writers less willing to get off their asses and write something of their own. They call it “mashup” or whatever, but it’s basically theft of not one, but several articles, rewritten, and the “authors” think that’s okay. So while the writer who made such a blanket statement may be right to say that most content has hit a saturation level, I think there’s still room for fresh ideas. Why?

    Because dammit, that’s what we do.

    Suppose you heard any of these statements:

    • Television is dead — all the shows have been done already.
    • Book writing is dead — unless you know someone, you’re not getting published.
    • Retail is dead — we already have too much crap.

    What would you say?

    So putting it into that perspective, do you think blogging is dead, or that content is no longer needed?

     

    #24253
    Yo Prinzel
    Yo Prinzel
    Participant

    Fresh ideas, fresh perspectives, fresh voices–the goal is not to try and “win” at teh content marketing, but to offer something that others can’t–because they aren’t you. There will always be room for new additions and there will always be opportunities for visibility to rise. If that weren’t true, libraries would have killed both fiction and non-fiction industries.

    #24296

    LoriWidmer
    Participant

    Maybe that’s where the dude is coming from, Yo. Maybe he sees “content” and thinks it’s “contest.”

    I don’t know. I still buy books, I still read articles, I still subscribe to magazines, and I still read blog posts. Maybe this guru isn’t right?

    #24297

    Jennifer Mattern
    Keymaster

    That’s one of my issues with this idea. It’s coming from someone who clearly doesn’t believe it enough to stop creating Web content themselves. If the issues was really something to be concerned about, as opposed to something controversial to say to drum up discussion, that discussion wouldn’t be happening on, you guessed it, a blog. The same goes for most people I’ve seen agreeing with him. They’re also posting about it on their own blogs. It makes me wonder if they even realize the hypocrisy of it. I’m guessing many don’t.

    Another issue is there is so much emphasis on the quantity of content available without as much thought put into quality, as Lori mentioned. It doesn’t matter if total content available quadruples in a day if most of it is bullshit. Most people will never be exposed to most of the content created. They’re exposed to things that were deemed good enough to share by people whose opinions they trust. Readers have such a ridiculous amount of control these days in not only what content they consume, but how they consume it. No one has any chance of overloading them other than themselves.

    All it proves on the business front is what many of us have been saying for years — that it’s not just about churning out content, but building relationships. When you have those, your content will be consumed by people who know, trust, and care about your business and what it offers, no matter what your competitors do.

    As for blogs specifically, the notion that a new blog can’t get an audience these days is complete and utter bullshit as well. You both know I’ve run a lot of blogs over the years. I’ve built significant audiences in several niches, and when I take a new project seriously, it never takes long to build up a readership. That happens whether I use my existing sites to promote it or not (as some are in completely irrelevant niches where cross-promotion doesn’t make sense). It all comes down to whether or not you’re willing to put the work in. If you want to sit on your ass and be lazy about how you run your business, sure, you have a greater chance of staying invisible now. I just happen to think that’s a good thing.

    Jennifer Mattern - Owner 3 Beat Media

    Professional Blogger, Freelance Business Writer, Author

    #24443

    LoriWidmer
    Participant

    Jenn, you’ve hit on one of my peeves — content that’s clearly garbage. While I have a larger distaste for content that’s rewritten from other sources — “mashups” as they call them, and yes, to me it’s unethical — I hate wasting my time looking for something only to have to click through five links of trash before I get to something that hasn’t been rewritten or stolen outright or even so off point that it’s rendered useless.

    I found it interesting that the discussion of how dead blogging was did occur on a blog, as you pointed out. Because of that alone, I discounted what was being said. But any time I hear these blanket pronouncements, I know someone is either A) not really trying hard to learn how to do it right, or B) trying to create debate and drive traffic. I’d say the latter is what we’re looking at in this case.

    #24512

    Jennifer Mattern
    Keymaster

    That, or maybe bloggers with perceived authority are trying to persuade newer folks from jumping in. After all, less competition means their content retains more of its audience and “value.” ;)

    Jennifer Mattern - Owner 3 Beat Media

    Professional Blogger, Freelance Business Writer, Author

    #24517
    Yo Prinzel
    Yo Prinzel
    Participant

    I think the biggest problem now is too many people are thinking “formula” instead of “personal.” A few years ago, before we had a Formula For Success (TM), we just relied on our personalities to catapult our content. Now it’s all about completing steps 1-3 to VIRAL CITY. When you do that, you miss out on the spark of youness that could actually create your success. Then, you start pronouncing everything as dead.

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